FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION


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The weekly radio show that was aired on AMAM radio this Saturday raised the issue of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM).

The usual speakers were Regine Psaila, Lorraine Fotso and Thomas Eyonga.


According to the WHO, “FGM is an internationally recognized human rights violation. Female genital mutilation (FGM) refers to all procedures involving partial or total removal of the female external genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons."


Eyonga supported the cultural and traditional aspect of the practice, saying that Female Genital Mutilation was part of a girl's education and preparation for adulthood and marriage.


He said “Our grandparents had to remove the external genitalia so that women would not have sexual urges with men. Young girls must be virgins until they get married.


PSAILA and FOTSO refuted the argument presented and highlighted several negative aspects on the life of these young girls or women who have been mutilated: severe pain, severe bleeding, urinary problems, cysts, infections, complications during childbirth, risk of death of the new-born, problems with wound healing,death, etc.


Fotso asked him a question that remained unanswered. She wanted to know if there was “an equivalent for a man to stop his sexual urge? “


Psaila asked how many men have ever had a look at their mutilated wife's genitals, to see how they look. According to what she said, they would advocate for the criminalisation of that practice if they see what their women suffer.


It is estimated that more than 200 million girls and women have been subjected to genital mutilation in 30 countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia.


At the end, Eyonga joined the ladies on the show by bringing up as solutions the creation of an Association or NGO in order to denounce in the face of the world these practices, viewed as abominable, traumatic and that affect many lives.



Watch the full episode here




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